In late December, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) adopted a rules amendment to ban the inclusion of CBD in manufactured products. They will be taking a closer look into banning bars and restaurants from using CBD in alcoholic drinks made on-site in the coming year. 

The ban officially begins January 1, but OLCC has said it will educate license holders and wait until February, being sensitive to the fact that some businesses may not be aware they are in violation of the recent change.

CBD, the common name for cannabidiol, is derived from cannabis, but can also be derived from other plants. Cannabis plants produce a wide range of chemical compounds including THC,  and CBD, a non-intoxicating component.

While CBD is legal, the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) classification of it as a drug subjects it to formal approval by the US Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) when it is combined with foods or beverages. 

OLCC’s purview is limited to alcoholic beverages, leaving the rules for non-alcoholic CBD-containing products to other governing bodies.

Proponents of CBD cite its use in the reduction of anxiety and depression, alleviation of pain and promotion of better sleep. 

Opponents argue that there has not been enough investigation into the effects of CBD to determine its safety or effectiveness.