By David Krogh

The Oregon Chapter of the American Planning Association sponsored a webinar November 8, to provide follow up regarding the controversial, mandated implementation of HB2001. The webinar provided an overview of HB2001 and the timing for cities to comply. 

HB2001 was passed by the State Legislature earlier this year and creates a requirement that single family zoning will no longer be exclusionary. For Portland and the cities within the Metro area, all single family zones will have to be modified to allow duplexes, triplexes, 4-plexes, cottage clusters and townhouses in addition to single family houses.  

What is new is that the State Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) will be developing two model ordinances which would properly implement HB2001. 

One of these would be an example appropriate for medium sized cities and the other for large cities. Cities could use the model as a template or simply adopt it as their own.  

Cities will have limited flexibility in siting and standards and can request deferments if infrastructure is not adequate to accommodate the level of densification which HB2001 mandates. 

It is hoped these new standards will increase the variety of housing available throughout the state (which DLCD estimates to be in a shortfall of 155,000 units by 2035) and provide the opportunity for more affordable housing units. 

For Portland it was indicated that approximately 4,000 new units would likely be created within the next decade as part of the implementation of HB2001. 

Some of this will cause displacement, particularly in parts of East Portland and the City will be looking into how to avoid this as the process unfolds.  

Small cities need to comply by June 30, 2021 and large cities (including Portland) by June 30, 2022. DLCD will be able to provide some technical assistance. 

Portland’s Residential Infill Project (RIP) has already been going through hearings and is anticipated to be completed long before the State deadlines.